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By Eric Heinz

City Council voted 4-0, with Councilman Chris Hamm absent, on Tuesday to approve what has become known as the Rancho San Clemente Business Park overlay to allow an emergency (homeless) shelter to be built in its area.

This was the second reading of the ordinance.

Councilwoman Lori Donchak voted for it this time around and said she opposed it last time because she was in favor of establishing two overlays in San Clemente.

This approval does not guarantee a homeless or emergency shelter would be built there, but it does bring the city into compliance with Senate Bill 2, which requires municipalities to designate an area for such usage. A map of the overlay can be found at www.san-clemente.org under Government, City Council, Agenda and the Nov. 1, 2016 City Council meeting.

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comments (2)

  • Oops looks like the city has to accommodate an underprivileged class. Oh no! What’s gonna happen to sweet little San Clemente with its huge retailers and exponentially growing commercial industries? Such a travesty!!!!!

  • Gotta’ love the low acumen biased hate inspired comments.

    Sadly, this is nothing more than the city complying with hollow and unfunded mandates by our inept state leaders.

    If the state wanted to really help the homeless they’d take some ownership of it at the state level and follow the successful examples from other states such as Utah, and the states that learned from them and implemented similar solutions.

comments (2)

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