MAREK DOBKE, M.D., San Clemente

Dear Mr. Sillas, I read your comment, “It is time for equal pay for men and women” published in San Clemente Times. In principle, I agree with you: there should be equality in wages and awards, and deciding on wages should be gender-blind. However, regarding soccer, it is simply business, and male games attract more viewers, TV advertisements, promotions, etc. For example, when you visit the stadium where the Galaxy plays, see how many people buy jerseys adorned with the name “Ibrahimovic.” However, I did not see any females wearing a jersey with a female player’s name. Income from male games is simply higher. So, proportionally or disproportionally, male players receive more. Changing subjects: male models earn a small fraction compared to female fashion models, and nobody protests. . . .

Overall, although we strive for equality, we have to live with practical realities, too, and accept that arithmetical equality is not always feasible, even if theoretically appropriate.

Editor’s note: According to Fox Sports, which broadcast the U.S.’s 2-0 victory over the Netherlands in the FIFA Women’s World Cup final earlier this month, the American audience on English-language television was 14.27 million on Fox Sports platforms—20% higher than the 2018 men’s World Cup final. Including streaming and the 1.6 million viewers on Telemundo, the total was 15.87 million viewers for the 2019 women’s final in France, compared to 12.51 million who tuned in across all platforms for the 2018 men’s final in Russia.

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